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Day 23, Cocktail 21

Time to get caught up from a busy weekend.  Saturday night started with a cocktail at Bryant’s with Gwen.  She had her usual Love and Happiness while I asked Michael for something with rye and maraschino liqueur.  His answer was an unnamed cocktail that featured rye, maraschino, chartreuse and bitters.  Technically, I should use this as one of my cocktails, but I’m going to pass for a couple of reasons.  First is that I don’t have the exact recipe, although I’m pretty sure I can duplicate it.  The second is that, frankly, I felt the chartreuse overpowered the cocktail.  I’d need to play around with this one before I used it.

After Bryant’s, it was on to Eddie Martini’s for dinner.  We had are usual martinis before dinner which were very good.  The foie gras appetizer was outstanding the filets were very good.  It is tempting to lay my martini recipe on you, but I’m saving it for a classic coktails week.

So, to get going, I have one last maraschino cocktail.  This cocktail is called the Charleston and comes from The Cocktail Bible. 

  Charleston 

  • 1/2 oz gin
  • 1/2 oz dry vermouth
  • 1/2 oz sweet vermouth
  •  1/2 oz Cointreau
  • 1/2 oz Luxardo marschino liqueur
  • 1/2 oz kirschwasswer

Mix all the ingredients in a shaker with ice cubes. Shake to chill thoroughly (and allow the 20% or so by volume of water that any boozy cocktail needs to melt off the ice). Pour into a chilled cocktail glass and garnish with a lemon peel.

The Luxardo and kirsch blend to dominate with their cherry flavors. I have to admit, I was tentative about making this one tonight because, frankly, I don’t like kirsch. Fortunately, the Luxardo, sweet vermouth and Cointreau subdue the harsh flavor of the kirsch while the gin and dry vermouth provide the underpinnings for this cocktail. As I sit here sipping it (while listening to Nancy Sinatra sing “Bang Bang” from Kill Bill) this drink is growing on me. I don’t know that it would ever be one of my favorites, but it is easy for me to imangine that 100 years ago bartenders were mixing drinks that tasted a lot like this one.

Cheers!

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